• date_floor() rounds a date or date-time down to a multiple of the specified precision.

  • date_ceiling() rounds a date or date-time up to a multiple of the specified precision.

  • date_round() rounds up or down depending on what is closer, rounding up on ties.

There are separate help pages for rounding dates and date-times:

These functions round the underlying duration itself, relative to an origin. For example, rounding to 15 hours will construct groups of 15 hours, starting from origin, which defaults to a naive time of 1970-01-01 00:00:00.

If you want to group by components, such as "day of the month", see date_group().

date_floor(x, precision, ..., n = 1L, origin = NULL)

date_ceiling(x, precision, ..., n = 1L, origin = NULL)

date_round(x, precision, ..., n = 1L, origin = NULL)

Arguments

x

[Date / POSIXct / POSIXlt]

A date or date-time vector.

precision

[character(1)]

A precision. Allowed precisions are dependent on the input used.

...

These dots are for future extensions and must be empty.

n

[positive integer(1)]

A single positive integer specifying a multiple of precision to use.

origin

[Date(1) / POSIXct(1) / POSIXlt(1) / NULL]

An origin to start counting from. The default origin is midnight on 1970-01-01 in the time zone of x.

Value

x rounded to the specified precision.

Examples

# See the type specific documentation for more examples x <- as.Date("2019-03-31") + 0:5 x
#> [1] "2019-03-31" "2019-04-01" "2019-04-02" "2019-04-03" "2019-04-04" #> [6] "2019-04-05"
# Flooring by 2 days, note that this is not tied to the current month, # and instead counts from the specified `origin`. date_floor(x, "day", n = 2)
#> [1] "2019-03-31" "2019-03-31" "2019-04-02" "2019-04-02" "2019-04-04" #> [6] "2019-04-04"