date_build() builds a Date from it's individual components.

date_build(year, month = 1L, day = 1L, ..., invalid = NULL)

Arguments

year

[integer]

The year. Values [-32767, 32767] are generally allowed.

month

[integer]

The month. Values [1, 12] are allowed.

day

[integer / "last"]

The day of the month. Values [1, 31] are allowed.

If "last", then the last day of the month is returned.

...

These dots are for future extensions and must be empty.

invalid

[character(1) / NULL]

One of the following invalid date resolution strategies:

  • "previous": The previous valid instant in time.

  • "previous-day": The previous valid day in time, keeping the time of day.

  • "next": The next valid instant in time.

  • "next-day": The next valid day in time, keeping the time of day.

  • "overflow": Overflow by the number of days that the input is invalid by. Time of day is dropped.

  • "overflow-day": Overflow by the number of days that the input is invalid by. Time of day is kept.

  • "NA": Replace invalid dates with NA.

  • "error": Error on invalid dates.

Using either "previous" or "next" is generally recommended, as these two strategies maintain the relative ordering between elements of the input.

If NULL, defaults to "error".

If getOption("clock.strict") is TRUE, invalid must be supplied and cannot be NULL. This is a convenient way to make production code robust to invalid dates.

Value

A Date.

Details

Components are recycled against each other.

Examples

date_build(2019)
#> [1] "2019-01-01"
date_build(2019, 1:3)
#> [1] "2019-01-01" "2019-02-01" "2019-03-01"
# Generating invalid dates will trigger an error try(date_build(2019, 1:12, 31))
#> Error : Invalid date found at location 2. #> Resolve invalid date issues by specifying the `invalid` argument.
# You can resolve this with `invalid` date_build(2019, 1:12, 31, invalid = "previous")
#> [1] "2019-01-31" "2019-02-28" "2019-03-31" "2019-04-30" "2019-05-31" #> [6] "2019-06-30" "2019-07-31" "2019-08-31" "2019-09-30" "2019-10-31" #> [11] "2019-11-30" "2019-12-31"
# But this particular case (the last day of the month) is better # specified as: date_build(2019, 1:12, "last")
#> [1] "2019-01-31" "2019-02-28" "2019-03-31" "2019-04-30" "2019-05-31" #> [6] "2019-06-30" "2019-07-31" "2019-08-31" "2019-09-30" "2019-10-31" #> [11] "2019-11-30" "2019-12-31"