These are year-month-weekday methods for the getter generics.

  • get_year() returns the Gregorian year.

  • get_month() returns the month of the year.

  • get_day() returns the day of the week encoded from 1-7, where 1 = Sunday and 7 = Saturday.

  • get_index() returns a value from 1-5 indicating that the corresponding weekday is the n-th instance of that weekday in the current month.

  • There are sub-daily getters for extracting more precise components.

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_year(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_month(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_day(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_index(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_hour(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_minute(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_second(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_millisecond(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_microsecond(x)

# S3 method for clock_year_month_weekday
get_nanosecond(x)

Arguments

x

[clock_year_month_weekday]

A year-month-weekday to get the component from.

Value

The component.

Examples

monday <- clock_weekdays$monday thursday <- clock_weekdays$thursday x <- year_month_weekday(2019, 1, monday:thursday, 1:4) x
#> <year_month_weekday<day>[4]> #> [1] "2019-01-Mon[1]" "2019-01-Tue[2]" "2019-01-Wed[3]" "2019-01-Thu[4]"
# Gets the weekday, 1 = Sunday, 7 = Saturday get_day(x)
#> [1] 2 3 4 5
# Gets the index indicating which instance of that particular weekday # it is in the current month (i.e. the "1st Monday of January, 2019") get_index(x)
#> [1] 1 2 3 4